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Pupil Premium

DfE Guidance on Pupil Premium Funding

The Pupil Premium was introduced in April 2011. Schools can make decisions about how to spend the Pupil Premium funding to ensure that there is a narrowing of the attainment gap.

The Pupil Premium provides funding for pupils:

  • pupils who qualify for free school meals, or have done at any time in the past six years (£1300 per child)
  • pupils who have a parent serving in the armed forces (£300 per child)
  • pupils who are in the care of, or provided with accommodation by an English local authority (LA) (looked after children LAC) (£1,900 per child)
  • pupils who were looked after by an English or Welsh local authority before being adopted, or who left care on a special guardianship order or child arrangements order (Post LAC) (£1900 per child)

Schools are held accountable for the spending of these monies, and performance tables will capture the achievement of disadvantaged students covered by the Pupil Premium.

This document outlines the proposed spend of the Pupil Premium 2019/20.

The school’s strategy for the 2019/20 year aims to address the following barriers to educational achievement among its pupils eligible for pupil premium

PPG-Plan-2019-2020aut2

The key objectives:

Spending to be reviewed at regular intervals for each objective to ensure it is in line with our expectations and the proposed plan.

Barrier 1- Experiential Audit showed limited enrichment opportunities outside of school

 

Key Objective 1:

Provide a wide range of enrichment opportunities to widen aspirations of children eligible for PP

 

Action:

Subsidising of educational trips and visits for PP pupils across the year (£15 average cost per pupil x3 terms)

Subsidising of Y6 Ghyll Head Residential

Minibuses to enable enrichment offer (vocabulary trips) – PP pupil allocation

Music (keyboard and guitar)

Choir

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Breakfast club

After school clubs (various clubs throughout the year)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

Budget cost

£11,925

£4,606

£2,500

£13,950

£6,500

£9,954

£10,000

£59,436.60

Rationale

The Education Endowment Foundation states:

Overall, studies of adventure learning interventions consistently show positive benefits on academic learning. On average, pupils who participate in adventure learning interventions make approximately four additional months’ progress. There is also evidence of an impact on non-cognitive outcomes such as self-confidence. The evidence suggests that the impact is greater for more vulnerable students and older learners (teenagers), longer courses (more than a week), and those in a ‘wilderness’ setting, though other types of intervention still show some positive impacts.

Overall, the impact of arts participation on academic learning appears to be positive. Improved outcomes have been identified in English, mathematics and science. Benefits have been found in both primary and secondary schools, with greater effects on average for younger learners and, in some cases, for disadvantaged pupils. Some arts activities have been linked with improvements in specific outcomes. For example, there is some evidence of a positive link between music and spatial awareness and between drama and writing. Wider benefits such as more positive attitudes to learning and increased well-being have also consistently been reported. EEF

 

A previous EEF effectiveness trial showed that offering pupils in primary schools a free and nutritious meal before school can boost their reading, writing, and maths results by an average of two months’ additional progress. Interestingly, it appears that it was not whether more pupils ate breakfast at all that made the difference, but whether more were going to the school breakfast club. It may be that school breakfasts are more nutritious than what pupils would otherwise have, or that attending the club effectively prepares pupils for learning. Breakfast club schools also saw an improvement in pupil behaviour.

 

Success Criteria:

Improved outcomes for Lac and PP pupils through accessing the above

  • PP pupils to be offered a place in morning breakfast club and a variety of after school clubs
  • Music lessons and choir practice is accessed by PP pupils
  • PP pupils in Y6 to be offered a free residential experience
Key Person:

Lisa Mason (Music Lead)

Spencer Keogh (UKS2 Lead)

Emily Asbery and Armaan Mohamed (Choir)

Monitoring and Evaluation:

Termly experiential audits (V Helliar)

Annual Residential monitoring (S Keogh)

Termly music monitoring (Lisa Mason)

Barrier 2 

–          Lack of high quality reading and writing materials in the home

–          % EAL school population and corresponding need in parents

Poor parental understanding of how to support and help early reading and writing

Key Objective 2

Raise attainment and progress in reading and writing for children eligible for PP

 

Action:

Phase Lead without class responsibility (UKS2) 25% timetable to support Literacy

Linguascope subscription for whole school EAL Vocabulary groups

Tutor Trust Literacy tuition for PP pupils

Anchor Education

Additional books for class libraries

Phonics Tracker

Phonics Play

Imagination Library

EAL Vocabulary intervention (Vocabulary focus: Literacy, Numeracy and Topic)

Phonics booster groups in R, Y1 and Y2

English booster groups

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Family Literacy classes for parents/ carers/ family members

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

Budgeted cost

£10,904

£360

£2,500

£2173

£4100

£332

£120

£268.62

£10,480

£3,620

£2,288

£0 (volunteer tutors)

£561 (crèche facility)

 

 

 

 

 

 

£37,706.62

Rationale

Overall, studies of oral language interventions consistently show positive impact on learning, including on oral language skills and reading comprehension. On average, pupils who participate in oral language interventions make approximately five months’ additional progress over the course of a year.

Overall, studies of oral language interventions consistently show positive impact on learning

All pupils appear to benefit from oral language interventions, but some studies show slightly larger effects for younger children and pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds (up to six months’ additional progress).

Some types of oral language interventions appear to be more effective than others, on average. Interventions which are directly related to text comprehension or problem-solving appear to have greater impact. There is also consistent evidence supporting reading to young children and encouraging them to answer questions and to talk about the story with a trained adult. A number of studies show the benefits of trained teaching assistants effectively supporting both oral language skills and reading outcomes. EEF

Overall, studies of oral language interventions consistently show positive impact on learning

All pupils appear to benefit from oral language interventions, but some studies show slightly larger effects for younger children and pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds (up to six months’ additional progress). EEF

Phonics approaches have been consistently found to be effective in supporting younger readers to master the basics of reading, with an average impact of an additional four months’ progress. Research suggests that phonics is particularly beneficial for younger learners (4-7 year olds) as they begin to read. Teaching phonics is more effective on average than other approaches to early reading (such as whole language or alphabetic approaches), though it should be emphasised that effective phonics techniques are usually embedded in a rich literacy environment for early readers and are only one part of a successful literacy strategy. EEF

Two recent meta-analyses from the USA suggested that increasing parental engagement in primary and secondary schools had on average two to three months’ positive impact. There is some evidence that supporting parents with their first child will have benefits for siblings.  Parents’ aspirations also appear to be important for pupil outcomes, although there is limited evidence to show that intervening to change parents’ aspirations will raise their children’s aspirations and achievement over the longer term. EEF

Success Criteria:

  • Termly progress and attainment monitoring shows diminished difference between PP/non PP
  • GLD, Phonics, KS1 and KS2 end of year data shows diminished difference from 2018/2019 figures
Key Person:

Lydia Wilkinson (Assistant Principal- Teaching and Learning)

Val Helliar (Assistant Principal- Teaching and Learning)

Kirsty Dunn & Spencer Keogh (Literacy Leads)

Monitoring and Evaluation: 

Half Termly Intervention monitoring

Termly progress meetings

Progress review- group analysis

Termly assessment in R,W, GaPS

Barrier 3    

–          Lack of maths materials in the home

–          Poor parental understanding of how to support and help maths skills development

–          Parents educated abroad and using different methods to support children

Key Objective 3:

Raise attainment and progress in maths for children eligible for PP

Action:

Phase Lead without class responsibility (UKS2) 25% timetable to support maths

Teacher Development CPD program to develop staff use of Maths No Problem strategies

Teacher numeracy booster groups for Y5&Y6

Tutor Trust Maths tuition for PP pupils

Twinkle subscription

Family Numeracy for parents/ carers and family members

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

Budgeted cost

£10,904

£10,000

£3,456

£2,500

£861

£0 (Volunteer tutors)

£561 crèche facility

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£28,282

Rationale

The EEF toolkit suggests that mastery learning accelerates progress. Work is challenging and is particularly effective when pupils work in groups and take responsibility for supporting each other’s progress.

Quality of teaching is the single most important driver of pupil attainment and a range of other positive outcomes. EEF.

The EEF toolkit suggests that interventions matched to specific pupils’ needs can be effective, particularly when delivered through 1:1 or through small group support.

Sutton Trust – Small Group Tuition – moderate impact, moderate cost +4 months Overall, evidence shows that small group tuition is effective and, as a rule of thumb, the smaller the group the better. It enables the teacher to focus exclusively on a small number of learners, usually in a separate classroom or working area. Intensive tuition in small groups is often provided to support lower attaining learners or those who are falling behind, but it can also be used as a more general strategy to ensure effective progress, or to teach challenging topics or skills.

Tutor Trust – Affordable Tutoring. The Tutor Trust provide affordable tuition to primary and secondary schools by recruiting and training university students as paid tutors. We ran a trial for Year 6 pupils in disadvantaged schools who were working below age-expected levels, and found students receiving tutoring from Tutor Trust made an additional 3 months progress compared to the control group. They currently work in Manchester, Leeds and Liverpool. EEF

Two recent meta-analyses from the USA suggested that increasing parental engagement in primary and secondary schools had on average two to three months’ positive impact. There is some evidence that supporting parents with their first child will have benefits for siblings.  Parents’ aspirations also appear to be important for pupil outcomes, although there is limited evidence to show that intervening to change parents’ aspirations will raise their children’s aspirations and achievement over the longer term. EEF

Success Criteria:

  • Termly progress and attainment monitoring shows diminished difference between PP/non PP
  • GLD, Phonics, KS1 and KS2 end of year data shows diminished difference from 2016-17 figures
Key Person:

Soraya Wallace (Assistant Principal- Inclusion)

Lydia Wilkinson (Assistant Principal- Teaching and Learning)

Spencer Keogh (UKS2 Lead)

Laura Sutton (KS1 Lead)

Emily Asbery and Laura Sutton (Maths Leads)

Monitoring and Evaluation: 

Half Termly Intervention monitoring

Termly progress meetings

Termly assessment in Maths and Arithmetic

 

Barrier 4

–          Low Entry point/ baselines in Nursery and Reception

–          SEND Communication and Interaction

 

Key Objective 4:

Lack of educational materials in the home.

Poor parental understanding of how to support and help skills development.

Action:

1:1 Speech and Language therapy

Speech and Language therapy groups

ELKLAN TA to carry out screening and interventions

ELKLAN TA in KS1 to carry out interventions

Narrative therapy

Lego Therapy

WELLCOMM Language Screening, staff training and staff resource time in EYFS (2members of staff 25%)

Total

Budgeted cost

£16,425

£9,613

£19,226

£4,000

£3,348

£760

£9,600

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£58,976

Rationale

The impact of SEND on academic attainment is closely related to the EEF’s focus on economic disadvantage: 27% of pupils with special educational needs are eligible for free school meals compared to 12% of pupils without special educational needs.

 

The EEF toolkit suggests that interventions matched to specific pupils needs can be effective, particularly when delivered through 1:1 or through small group support.

The EEF toolkit suggests communication and language approaches are effective for developing young children’s expressive vocabulary and early reading skills learning, including their spoken language skills. Furthermore, Phonics approaches have been consistently effective in supporting younger readers to master the basics of reading.

Sutton Trust suggests that Oral Language Interventions have moderate impact for low cost +5 months. Oral language interventions emphasise the importance of spoken language and verbal interaction. Overall, studies of oral language interventions consistently show positive impact on learning, including on oral language skills and reading comprehension.

 

Success Criteria:

  • Children in Nursery and Reception to achieve developmentally as non PP
  • All PP in Reception to have ELKLAN screening and intervention
  • PP in Nursery to have ELKLAN interventions
  • PP children with SEND (Communication and Interaction) to be in receipt of speech and language therapy
Key Person:

Soraya Wallace (Assistant Principal- Inclusion)

Val Helliar (Assistant Principal- Teaching and Learning)

Jo Mills (SENDco) Anita Walker (SENDco maternity cover)

Monitoring and Evaluation:

Termly progress and attainment monitoring shows accelerated progress and increase attainment (GLD).

Barrier 5  –    Mental Health and Wellbeing of PP vulnerable children in school

 

Key Objective 5:

Lack of resources for therapeutic materials in the home.

Lack of CAMH’s resources.

Poor parental understanding of how to support and help children with poor social, emotional and mental health difficulties.

Action:

Self-regulation groups

Friendship groups

Forest schools

Forest school TA training

Mindfulness Group

LAC

SEND learning mentors x3

 

 

 

CPD for specific vulnerable children

Webster Stratton course for parents/ carers

Webster Stratton resource

Confident Parent/ Confident Children course for Parents/ Carers/ Family members

 

Little voice Young Citizens

Pastoral Team to deliver Nurture intervention

Safeguarding Officer for vulnerable children and Early Help Assessments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

Budgeted cost

£6,774

£2,500

£3,200

£900

£6,500

£16,871

£25,270

£14,249

£500

 

£4,096

£561 Crèche facility

£1,600

 

£0 (Manchester Family Education)

£561 Crèche facility

£98

 

£21,768

£13,295

£15,495

£13,027

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£169,070

Rationale

Sutton Trust suggest that Social and Emotional Learning has moderate impact for moderate cost +4 months:

Interventions which target social and emotional learning (SEL) seek to improve pupils’ interaction with others and self-management of emotions, rather than focusing directly on the academic or cognitive elements of learning. SEL interventions might focus on the ways in which students work with (and alongside) their peers, teachers, family or community. Social and emotional learning leads to greater engagement in learning. On average, SEL interventions have an identifiable and valuable impact on attitudes to learning and social relationships in school.

The EEF toolkit suggests that interventions matched to specific pupils’ needs can be effective, particularly when delivered through 1:1 or through small group support.

Quality of teaching is the single most important driver of pupil attainment and a range of other positive outcomes. EEF

Parents play a crucial role in supporting their children’s learning, and levels of parental engagement are consistently associated with children’s academic outcomes.͟ EEF

Evidence suggests that, on average, behaviour interventions can produce moderate improvements in academic performance along with a decrease in problematic behaviours. However, estimated benefits vary widely across the categories of programme described above. Impacts are larger for targeted interventions matched to specific students with particular needs or behavioural issues than for universal interventions or whole school strategies. School-level behaviour approaches are often related to improvements in attainment, but there is a lack of evidence to show that the improvements are actually caused by the behaviour interventions, rather than other school interventions happening the same time. Parental and community involvement programmes are often associated with reported improvements in school ethos or discipline and so are worth considering as alternatives to direct behaviour interventions.

Approaches such as improving teachers’ behaviour management and pupils’ cognitive and social skills seem to be equally effective.

 

Success Criteria:

  • Barriers to learning, as a result of Children’s social, emotional and mental health difficulties, are reduced/ removed
  • Learning behaviours improve (reflected in termly Behaviour report)
Key Person:

Soraya Wallace (Assistant Principal- Inclusion)

Jo Mills (SENDco and Mental Health Lead) Anita Walker (SENDco maternity cover)

Safeguarding team: Sharon Egan (DDSL) and Michelle Gandy (Safeguarding Officer)

Dee Lowe (Senior Pastoral Lead) and Val Owen (Pastoral Lead)

Monitoring and Evaluation:

Termly progress and attainment monitoring shows accelerated progress and increased attainment

Therapeutic reports show social, emotional and mental health progress

Strength and difficulty questionnaires show social, emotional and mental health progress

 

Total expenditure £353,471.22

 

 

To see copies of the latest BFET Financial Statements please click here