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Pupil Premium

DfE Guidance on Pupil Premium Funding

The Pupil Premium was introduced in April 2011. Schools can make decisions about how to spend the Pupil Premium funding to ensure that there is a narrowing of the attainment gap.

The Pupil Premium provides funding for pupils:

  • pupils who qualify for free school meals, or have done at any time in the past six years (£1300 per child)
  • pupils who have a parent serving in the armed forces (£300 per child)
  • pupils who are in the care of, or provided with accommodation by an English local authority (LA) (looked after children LAC) (£1,900 per child)
  • pupils who were looked after by an English or Welsh local authority before being adopted, or who left care on a special guardianship order or child arrangements order (Post LAC) (£1900 per child)

Schools are held accountable for the spending of these monies, and performance tables will capture the achievement of disadvantaged students covered by the Pupil Premium.

 

This document outlines the proposed spend of the Pupil Premium 2018/19.

The school’s strategy for the 2018/19 year aims to address the following barriers to educational achievement among its pupils eligible for pupil premium

PPG Plan 2018 – 2019

 

The key objectives:

Impact Analysis 2017/18

The table below displays Pupil Premium progress compared to Non Pupil Premium progress

Pupil Premium Non Pupil Premium
  Reading Writing Maths Reading Writing Maths
Year 1
Below            
Just Below   4% 8% 9% 4% 7%
Expected 20% 12% 20% 11% 78% 12%
Accelerated 80% 84% 72% 81% 80% 81%
Year 2
Below 15%     5% 10% 8%
Just Below 74% 79% 63% 59% 59% 54%
Expected  5% 10% 16% 8% 6% 10%
Accelerated 16% 11% 11% 28% 25% 26%
Year 3
Below 10% 3% 3% 2%    
Just Below 10% 3% 3% 2% 4%  
Expected 57% 61% 54% 33% 40% 48%
Accelerated 23% 33% 40% 62% 56% 52%
Year 4
Below 6%     7% 11% 6%
Just Below 14% 15% 28% 18% 11% 9%
Expected 60%  62% 52% 50% 42% 55%
Accelerated 20% 33% 20% 25% 36% 30%
Year 5
Below 7% 4% 4% 2%  2% 4%
Just Below   8% 4% 8% 8% 13%
Expected 26% 28% 40% 30% 32% 28%
Accelerated 67% 64% 52% 60% 58% 55%
Year 6
Below 4% 4%        
Just Below 8% 8% 16% 7%    
Expected 42% 50% 29% 39% 54% 46%
Accelerated 46% 38% 54% 54% 46% 54%

 

 

This document outlines the proposed spend of the Pupil Premium 2018/19.

The school’s strategy for the 2018/19 year aims to address the following barriers to educational achievement among its pupils eligible for pupil premium.

The key objectives:

 

Spending to be reviewed at regular intervals for each objective to ensure it is in line with our expectations and the proposed plan.

Barrier 1- Experiential Audit showed limited enrichment opportunities outside of school

 

Key Objective 1:

Provide a wide range of enrichment opportunities to widen aspirations of children eligible for PP

 

Action:

Subsidising of educational trips and visits for PP pupils across the year (£15 average cost per pupil x3 terms)

Subsidising of Inclusion trips

Music (keyboard, guitar and choir)

 

Subsidising of Y5 and Y6 Ghyll Head Residentials

Drama (Shakespeare Schools Foundation)

Breakfast Club

After school clubs (various clubs throughout the year)

 

Minibuses to enable enrichment offer (vocabulary trips) – PP pupil allocation

Total

Budget cost

£13,275

 

 

£250

£13,950

£2,850

£5,160

 

£2,300

 

£2,700

£5000

 

 

£2,000

 

£47,485

Rationale

The Education Endowment Foundation states: Adventure education usually involves collaborative learning experiences with a high level of physical (and often emotional) challenge. Practical problem- solving, explicit reflection and discussion of thinking and emotion may be involved. All of the above have been shown to have a positive impact on outcomes.

 

Benefits of arts participation have been found in primary schools, with greater effects on average for younger learners and, in some cases, for disadvantaged pupils. Wider benefits such as more positive attitudes to learning and increased well-being have also consistently been reported. EEF

 

 

Success Criteria:

  • PP pupils to be offered a place in morning breakfast club after school club
  • PP pupils in Y5- 6 to be offered a free residential experience
Key Person:

Lisa Mason (Music Lead)

Gemma Fletcher (UKS2 Lead)

Natasha Worrall (Art Lead)

Monitoring and Evaluation:

Termly experiential audits (L Wilkinson)

Annual Residential monitoring (G Fletcher)

Art Club half termly monitoring (Natasha Worrall)

Termly music monitoring (Lisa Mason)

 

 

 

Barrier 2 

–          Lack of high quality reading and writing materials in the home

–          % EAL school population and corresponding need in parents

Poor parental understanding of how to support and help early reading and writing

Key Objective 2

Raise attainment and progress in reading and writing for children eligible for PP

 

Action:

X2 Phase Leads without class responsibility (UKS2 and KS1) 25% timetable to support Literacy

 

Beanstalk (Reading)

Phonics booster groups in R, Y1 and Y2

Literacy booster groups

Writing group with SENDco

Tutor Trust Literacy tuition for PP pupils

Christmas books for all children

Anchor Education

Additional books for class libraries

Phonics Tracker

Phonics Play

 

 

EAL Vocabulary intervention (Vocabulary focus: Literacy, Numeracy and Topic)

 

Family Literacy classes for parents/ carers/ family members

 

 

 

Easter Club

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

Budgeted cost

£10,904

£5,428

 

 

£2,320

£3,620

£2,288

£3,456

£270

£2,500

£278

£2173

£4100

£332

£120

 

 

£3,020

 

 

 

£0 (volunteer tutors)

£561 (crèche facility)

 

£1000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£41,809

Rationale

Quality of teaching is the single most important driver of pupil attainment and a range of other positive outcomes- EEF.

 

The EEF toolkit suggests communication and language approaches are effective for developing young children’s expressive vocabulary and early reading skills learning, including their spoken language skills. Furthermore, Phonics approaches have been consistently effective in supporting younger readers to master the basics of reading.

EEF toolkit suggests that reading comprehension approaches accelerate progress. These approaches appear to be particularly effective for older readers (aged 8 or above) who are not making expected progress.

 

Spelling, linked to vocabulary acquisition has been identified as a barrier to learning.

 

 

Parents play a crucial role in supporting their children’s learning, and levels of parental engagement are consistently associated with children’s academic outcomes. EEF

 

Sutton Trust – Summer Schools – low impact, moderate cost +2 months Summer schools are lessons or classes during the summer holidays. They are often designed as catch-up programs. Greater impacts (as much as four additional months’ progress) can be achieved when summer schools are intensive, well-resourced, and involve small group tuition by trained and experienced teachers.

Success Criteria:

  • Termly progress and attainment monitoring shows diminished difference between PP/non PP

GLD, Phonics, KS1 and KS2 end of year data shows diminished difference from 2016-17 figures

Key Person:

Lydia Wilkinson (Assistant Head- Teaching and Learning)

Soraya Wallace (Assistant Head- Inclusion)

Kirsty Dunn (Literacy Lead)

Monitoring and Evaluation: 

Half Termly Intervention monitoring

Termly progress meetings

Progress review- group analysis

Termly assessment in R,W, GaPS

 

 

Barrier 3    

–          Lack of maths materials in the home

–          Poor parental understanding of how to support and help maths skills development

–          Parents educated abroad and using different methods to support children

Key Objective 3:

Raise attainment and progress in maths for children eligible for PP

 

Action:

Phase Leads without class responsibility (UKS2 and KS1) 25% timetable to support maths

 

 

 

Reflective Inquiry – teacher CPD program to develop staff use of Maths No Problem strategies (77% of the year)

 

Teacher numeracy booster groups for Y5&Y6

Tutor Trust Maths tuition for PP pupils

Twinkle subscription

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Easter club

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Family Numeracy for parents/ carers and family members

 

 

 

Total

Budgeted cost

£10,904

£5,428

 

 

 

 

£30,000

 

 

 

 

£3,456

 

£2,500

 

£861

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£1000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£0 (Volunteer tutors)

£561 crèche facility

 

£54,149

Rationale

The EEF toolkit suggests that mastery learning accelerates progress. Work is challenging and is particularly effective when pupils work in groups and take responsibility for supporting each other’s progress.

 

Quality of teaching is the single most important driver of pupil attainment and a range of other positive outcomes. EEF.

 

 

The EEF toolkit suggests that interventions matched to specific pupils’ needs can be effective, particularly when delivered through 1:1 or through small group support.

Sutton Trust – Small Group Tuition – moderate impact, moderate cost +4 months Overall, evidence shows that small group tuition is effective and, as a rule of thumb, the smaller the group the better. It enables the teacher to focus exclusively on a small number of learners, usually in a separate classroom or working area. Intensive tuition in small groups is often provided to support lower attaining learners or those who are falling behind, but it can also be used as a more general strategy to ensure effective progress, or to teach challenging topics or skills.

 

Sutton Trust – Summer Schools – low impact, moderate cost +2 months Summer schools are lessons or classes during the summer holidays. They are often designed as catch-up programmes. Greater impacts (as much as four additional months’ progress) can be achieved when summer schools are intensive, well-resourced, and involve small group tuition by trained and experienced teachers.

 

Parents play a crucial role in supporting their children’s learning, and levels of parental engagement are consistently associated with children’s academic outcomes. EEF

 

Success Criteria:

  • Termly progress and attainment monitoring shows diminished difference between PP/non PP
  • GLD, Phonics, KS1 and KS2 end of year data shows diminished difference from 2016-17 figures
Key Person:

Soraya Wallace (Assistant Head- Inclusion)

Gemma Fletcher (UKS2 Lead)

Clare Niederbuhl and Laura Sutton (KS1 Leads)

Rachel Campbell (Maths Lead)

Monitoring and Evaluation: 

Half Termly Intervention monitoring

Termly progress meetings

Termly assessment in Maths and Arithmetic

 

 

 

Barrier 4

–          Low Entry point/ baselines in Nursery and Reception

–          SEND Communication and Interaction

 

Key Objective 4:

Lack of educational materials in the home.

Poor parental understanding of how to support and help skills development.

 

Action:

1:1 Speech and Language therapy

 

Speech and Language therapy groups

 

ELKLAN TA to carry out screening and interventions

 

 

 

ELKLAN TA in KS1 to carry out interventions

 

Narrative therapy

Lego Therapy

 

 

WELLCOMM Language Screening, staff training and staff resource time in EYFS.

 

Total

Budgeted cost

£16,425

 

£2,883

 

£19,226

 

 

 

 

£4,000

 

 

£3,348

 

£760

 

£30,000

 

 

 

£76,642

Rationale

The EEF toolkit suggests that interventions matched to specific pupils needs can be effective, particularly when delivered through 1:1 or through small group support.

The EEF toolkit suggests communication and language approaches are effective for developing young children’s expressive vocabulary and early reading skills learning, including their spoken language skills. Furthermore, Phonics approaches have been consistently effective in supporting younger readers to master the basics of reading.

Sutton Trust suggests that Oral Language Interventions have moderate impact for low cost +5 months. Oral language interventions emphasise the importance of spoken language and verbal interaction. Overall, studies of oral language interventions consistently show positive impact on learning, including on oral language skills and reading comprehension.

 

Success Criteria:

  • Children in Nursery and Reception to achieve developmentally as non PP
  • All PP in Reception to have ELKLAN screening and intervention
  • PP in Nursery to have ELKLAN interventions
  • PP children with SEND (Communication and Interaction) to be in receipt of speech and language therapy
Key Person:

Soraya Wallace (Assistant Head- Inclusion)

Jo Mills (SENDco)

Val Helliar (Foundation Lead)

Monitoring and Evaluation:

Termly progress and attainment monitoring shows accelerated progress and increase attainment (GLD).

 

Barrier 5  –    Mental Health and Wellbeing of PP vulnerable children in school

 

Key Objective 5:

Lack of resources for therapeutic materials in the home.

Lack of CAMH’s resources.

Poor parental understanding of how to support and help children with poor social, emotional and mental health difficulties.

 

Action:

Art therapy (80% of time allocation)

Counselling (50% of time allocation)

Pharos Group

Nature Group

Self-regulation groups

Friendship groups

Forest schools

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEND learning mentors x3

 

 

 

Attachment Training

2018 Attachment training (for LAC children)

Understanding and meeting the needs of looked after and adopted children in school

CPD for specific needs

 

Webster Stratton course for parents/ carers

 

 

 

Confident Parent/ Confident Children course for Parents/ Carers/ Family members

 

 

 

Total

Budgeted cost

£36,100

£18,820

£6,774

£6,774

£6,774

£2,500

£3,200

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£16,871

£25,270

£14,249

 

£478

 

 

 

£200

 

£200

 

£4,096

£561 Crèche facility

 

 

£0 (Manchester Family Education)

£561 Crèche facility

 

£142,306

Rationale

Sutton Trust suggest that Social and Emotional Learning has moderate impact for moderate cost +4 months:

Interventions which target social and emotional learning (SEL) seek to improve pupils’ interaction with others and self-management of emotions, rather than focusing directly on the academic or cognitive elements of learning. SEL interventions might focus on the ways in which students work with (and alongside) their peers, teachers, family or community. Social and emotional learning leads to greater engagement in learning. On average, SEL interventions have an identifiable and valuable impact on attitudes to learning and social relationships in school.

 

The EEF toolkit suggests that interventions matched to specific pupils’ needs can be effective, particularly when delivered through 1:1 or through small group support.

 

Quality of teaching is the single most important driver of pupil attainment and a range of other positive outcomes. EEF

 

 

 

 

 

Parents play a crucial role in supporting their children’s learning, and levels of parental engagement are consistently associated with children’s academic outcomes.͟ EEF

 

Success Criteria:

  • Barriers to learning, as a result of Children’s social, emotional and mental health difficulties, are reduced/ removed
  • Learning behaviours improve (reflected in termly Behaviour report)
Key Person:

Soraya Wallace (Assistant Head- Inclusion)

Jo Mills (SENDco and Mental Health Lead)

Safeguarding team: Sharon Egan (DDSL) and Michelle Gandy (Safeguarding Officer)

Behaviour team: Dee Lowe (Senior Behaviour Lead) and Val Owen (Behaviour Lead)

Monitoring and Evaluation:

Termly progress and attainment monitoring shows accelerated progress and increased attainment

Therapeutic reports show social, emotional and mental health progress

Strength and difficulty questionnaires show social, emotional and mental health progress

 

Total expenditure £362,391

 

 

 

 

 

To see copies of the latest BFET Financial Statements please click here